ABYSS: INDONESIA to BAN MASKED MONKEY SHOWS in CAPITAL


Indonesia to ban masked monkey shows in capital

Associated Press

By NINIEK KARMINI                                 October 27, 2013 8:15 PM
In this photo taken on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, a street monkey wears a baby doll mask as it performs in a slum in Jakarta, Indonesia. Security forces are fanning out across Jakarta conducting raids to rescue macaques used in popular street masked monkey performances in a move aimed at improving public order and preventing diseases carried by the monkeys. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
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                        JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia’s capital is getting rid of the monkey business.Security forces are conducting raids to rescue macaques used in masked monkey performances on Jakarta’s streets.The order came from Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo, better known as “Jokowi,” who wants all roadside monkey performances — known here as topeng monyet — gone by next year.

He said that besides improving public order and stopping animal abuse, the move is aimed at preventing diseases carried by the monkeys.

The city government will buy back all monkeys used as street buskers for about $90 and shelter them at a 1-hectare (2.5-acre) preserve at Jakarta’s Ragunan Zoo. The handlers and caretakers will be provided vocational training to help find new jobs.

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In this photo taken on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, a street …

In this photo taken on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, a street monkey wears a baby doll mask as it perform …

Animal rights groups have long campaigned for a ban on the shows, which often involve monkeys wearing plastic baby doll heads on their faces. They say the monkeys are hung from chains for long periods to train them to walk on their hind legs like humans. Their teeth are pulled so they can’t bite, and they are tortured to remain obedient. The monkeys are often outfitted in dresses and cowboy hats and forced to carry parasols or ride tiny bikes.

Femke den Haas of the Jakarta Animal Aid Network welcomed the decision, saying at least 22 monkeys have been rescued since the sweep began last week and quarantined for health issues. She estimated about 350 animals work as street performers in Jakarta, adding they are no longer able to live with other primates in zoos and cannot defend themselves in the wild.

In 2011, backed by the city administration, the group rescued 40 monkeys used in shows, which are often performed when traffic is backed up at Jakarta’s notoriously congested intersections. Many suffered illnesses, including tuberculosis and hepatitis.

Many of the macaques are trained at a slum area in eastern Jakarta, known locally as “monkey village.” A trained macaque can be sold for up to $135.

Sarinah, 37, who owns 13 monkeys used in the daily street shows, said the ban has hurt her livelihood. Seven of her macaques have been confiscated in recent raids.

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In this photo taken on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, a street …

In this photo taken on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, a street monkey performs in a slum in Jakarta, Indon …

“Of course I’m disappointed … but I cannot do anything!” said Sarinah, a mother of three who uses a single name like many Indonesians.

She said she takes good care of the animals and loves them like her own children.

“They are the source of our life, how could we be cruel to them? No way,” she said, adding that she earns about $3 daily from each monkey rented out to handlers.

She said she will keep her remaining monkeys hidden while waiting for a new job.

The mayor of Bandung, the provincial capital of West Java, has announced plans to ban monkey shows there as well.

http://news.yahoo.com/indonesia-ban-masked-monkey-shows-capital-090623593.html

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Very Rare Leopards Caught On Camera


Photo showing camera trap used for photographi...

Photo showing camera trap used for photographing nocturnal wildlife. An inset shows the receiver. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

javanleopard-600x388Very Rare Leopards Caught On Camera

Posted: 23 May 2013 11:38 AM PDT

Critically endangered Javan leopards have been caught on digital camera traps in West Java. If you have been following conservation news, you know that the Formosan Cloud Leopard was recently declared extinct. They were driven into extinction by human activities. So it is very important that the Javan leopards be protected or they may suffer the same fate.

Image Credit: CFIR

(Javan leopard caught on camera trap from CIFOR stock footage library on Vimeo.)

Thirty cameras were placed in Gunung Halimun-Salak National Park in West Java, by researcher Age Kridalaksana, from the Center for International Forestry Research. For about a month the cameras recorded images of local wildlife. Most of the animals documented by the cameras were deer, civets and birds. There were also three Javan leopards. These leopards are about one hundred pounds and the height and length of an American mountain lion.

There are probably less than 250 left in the wild, according to IUCN. Loss of habitat, poaching and loss of prey animals are contributing factors in their decline. All these factors are due to human activities.

About 2,000 hectares of rainforest a year are being lost each year due to industrial activities such as mining and land clearing for palm oil plantations. If you want to protect these leopards and their habitat, make sure to stop using products containing palm oil. (Boycotting palm oil will likely also help orangutans.)

Even within Gunung Halimun-Salak National Park 25% of the forested area was lost from illegal logging.

The huge city of Jakarta with 20 million people is just several hours from the park. Surely, these wild animals deserve to have some natural habitat protected and kept undeveloped.

The Center for International Forestry Research works to conserve natural forests and their wildlife. They also are study poor human communities and their relationship with natural habitats. Their work is some of the most important on Earth. What complements it the most is human population management. If the human population had not reached over seven billion, some of these very difficult situations would be less damaging.

Very Rare Leopards Caught On Camera was originally posted on: PlanetSave.